Kutupalong (Bangladesh) – Mohammed Jubayed came into the world shortly after midday in a baking hot military tent in the chaos of a vast refugee camp in Bangladesh, now home to nearly a million Rohingya.

Just an hour earlier, a cycle rickshaw had pulled up carrying his young mother Hasina Aktar clutching her stomach and moaning in pain in the throes of labour with her second child.

The United Nations says pregnant or breastfeeding women account for one in 10 of the estimated 520,000 Rohingya who have arrived in Bangladesh over the last six weeks after fleeing an upsurge in violence in neighbouring Myanmar.

Victims of one of the worst humanitarian crises of the 21st century, these women and their newborn babies are even more vulnerable than most to the desperate conditions in the camps, where even getting food and clean water is a battle.

Two older women help Hasina, 20, walk the few steps from the rickshaw to the tent, a makeshift delivery clinic that has just been put up by Bangladeshi soldiers in Kutupalong, the largest of the camps on the border with Myanmar.

Many Rohingya women give birth in their own makeshift shelters, with no formal help and no pain relief.

© AFP Munir UZ ZAMAN Hasina Aktar gave birth to Mohammed Jubayed at a makeshift delivery clinic that has just been put up by Bangladeshi soldiers in Kutupalong, the largest of the camps on the border with Myanmar

© AFP Munir UZ ZAMAN – Hasina Aktar gave birth to Mohammed Jubayed at a makeshift delivery clinic that has just been put up by Bangladeshi soldiers in Kutupalong, the largest of the camps on the border with Myanmar